Between the Lines

Between the Lines

About the "Between the Lines" blog

Our latest exhibition "Between the Lines" reflects our response to the commemoration of the 1914-18 conflict.

This blog will focus on stories behind the work by the E.A.S.T artists as well as looking at other artistic and cultural commemorations around the UK that relate to WWI.

The realities of war

Artist storiesPosted by Janette Sun, October 05, 2014 17:46:36

Between the Lines has not been afraid to look at many of the horrors of war, but often with a twist -

EAST member, Anne Norton, has created a work that explores both the horrors of war but war time correspondence in the form of letters from the Front.

It is incredible to think that in 1917 19,000 pieces of post crossed the Channel each day, keeping loved ones in touch.

The British Postal Museum and Archive have lots of information about the postal service during WW1 - http://www.postalheritage.org.uk/page/firstworldwar.


Barbed wire is not something that many people look at for its aesthetic qualities, but June Carroll has used barbed wire for the inspiration behind her sculptural work for Between the Lines.

Interestingly there was a song written during the conflict called The Old Barbed Wire, and it is typical of the “black humour” often used to cope with unbearable situations –

If you want to see the old battalion,

I know where they are.

I know where they are.

If you want to find the old battalion,

They're hanging on the old barbed wire.

I've seen 'em, I've seen 'em,

Hanging on the old barbed wire,

I've seen 'em,

Hanging on the old barbed wire.

(The above information about The Old Barbed Wire comes from the Western Front Association - http://www.westernfrontassociation.com)


Tricia North’s imaginative piece combines a narrative of improvised weaponry alongside the very British idea of afternoon tea, which itself becomes a “minefield of memories”.

You may never think of a “nice cup of tea” in the same way again!








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